About

Wild Food Adventures

Provides expertise in wild edible plants and foraging through workshops, expeditions, teaching events, presentations, outdoor guiding, and outfitting anywhere in North America. Technical advising, curriculum development, and custom research services are also available. Emphasis is on the past, present, and future uses of wild edible plants and other foragables. We also offer publications: the Wild Food Adventurer newsletter, a national periodical on wild foods. The Wild Food Primer, a guide to studying wild foods. And a bookstore complete with reviews of the best books available.

Areas of Expertise

Edible wild plants and other foragables of North America. Wild foods of Native Americans. The role wild foods play in recreational and unplanned survival. Wild Gourmet Garden Vegetables. Plant identification. Poisonous plants. Sea vegetables. Processing wild foods. Nutrition of wild foods. Research in these areas is continually being conducted.
Our Mission

Is to help people connect with the Earth, Earth culture, human history, and the future through the study of edible plants in natural settings. People who genuinely make these connections will live more sustainable lifestyles and be better caretakers of the environment.

Our mission is also to partner with and assist original North Americans in their efforts to restore and revitalize traditional foodways. Foodways involve the identification, collection, transportation, processing, storage, retrieval, and use of traditional wild foods. We strive to honor and preserve the wild food knowledge, experiences, and wisdom of original North Americans.

Edible Wild Plants Defined

Edible wild plants are wild plants with one or more parts that can be used for food if gathered at the appropriate stage of growth, and properly prepared. Edible wild plants could be weeds growing in urban areas to native plants growing in deep wilderness.

Foraging and Foragables Defined

Regarding humans and wild foods: Foraging is the process of searching for and gathering food or provisions from wild sources. As opposed to hunting or fishing. The distinction can be seen in how Native American tribes had a division of labor. The women and children foraged while the men hunted and fished. Foraging can be done to obtain plant products as well as animal products like shellfish, insects, and honey. Foragables are those things that can be gathered.

Note: Foragables is also spelled forageables and both are correct.