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WFA By Volume/Year

Volume 1, 1996 (1.1 – 1.4)

Cattails… Easy to Harvest, Fun to Eat. 1(1): 1, 1996.
Dandelions: The Good, The Bad, And the Ugly. 1(1): 1, 1996.
Wild Spinach: Delicious, Nutritious, and Abundant. 1(2): 1, 1996.
Edible Wild Plants Defined… This May Save Your Life. 1(2): 3, 1996.
Modern Gathering Etiquette: Don’t be a Wild Food Marauder. 1(2): 3, 1996.
Cattail Spikes: Pollen Means Protein. 1(2): 1, 1996.
Cattails Store Food For Winter. 1(3): 1, 1996.
Rose Hips and Vitamin C. 1(3): 1, 1996.
Wapato, Indian Potato. 1(4): 1, 1996..
Wild Gourmet Garden Vegetables. 1(4): 1, 1996.

Volume 2, 1997 (2.1 – 2.4)

Fiddleheads from Lady Fern. 2(1): 1, 1997
Skunk Cabbage… Lives Up to Its Name. 2(1): 1, 1997.
Wild Edibles Abound at U-Pick Farms. 2(2): 1, 1997.
Oregon Grape: Not for the Faint of Taste. 2(2): 1, 1997.
Wakas, Indian Popcorn. 2(3): 1, 1997.
Wild Lettuce, a Prickly Sight. 2(3): 1, 1997.
Bull Thistle. 2(4): 1, 1997.
Chickweed – It’s the Tops . 2(4): 1, 1997.
Personal Risk and Enlightenment . 2(4): 5, 1997.

Volume 3, 1998 (3.1 – 3.4)

Field Death Camas: History and Identification. 3(1): 1, 1998.
Edible Blue Camas: History and Identification. 3(1): 1, 1998.
Edible Blue Camas: Preparation Old and New. 3(2): 1, 1998.
Douglas Fir Chewing Gum: A Sappy Experience. 3(2): 11, 1998.
Amaranth – Staple Food Source for Modern Foragers. 3(2): 1, 1998.
Death Camas Toxicity. 3(2): 10, 1998.
Sassafras – Extraordinarily Flavorful Carcinogen. 3(3): 1, 1998.
Clamming for Cockles. 3(3): 1, 1998.
Cockles in Captivity. 3(4): 1, 1998.
Euell Gibbons – The Father of Modern Wild Foods. 3(4): 1, 1998.

Volume 4, 1999 (4.1 – 4.4)

Wild Food Roundtable. 4(1): 1, 1999.
Making Flour from Cattail’s Starch Filled Rhizomes. 4(1): 1, 1999.
Nettles: Naughty & Nice. 4(2): 1, 1999.
Poison Ivy, Poison Oak. 4(2): 1, 1999.
Poison Sumac. 4(3): 10, 1999.
Acorn Processing: The Proof is in the Pudding. 4(3): 1, 1999.
Itch Relief from Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac. 4(3): 10, 1999.
Mistaking Poison Hemlock for Wild Carrot. 4(4): 1, 1999.
Poison Hemlock’s Deadly Flavor. 4(4): 8, 1999.
Wild Carrot Flavor & Texture. 4(4): 1, 1999.

Volume 5, 2000 (5.1 – 5.4)

Wild Carrot and Poison Hemlock in Flower. 5(1): 1, 2000.
Wild Mustard – Fine Greens Almost All Year Long. 5(1): 1, 2000.
Y2K Gone, Wild Foods Persist. 5(1): 2, 2000.
Wild Foods – Does Anybody Sell This Stuff??!. 5(2): 10, 2000.
Tawny Day Lily – Unpredictably Tainted Fare. 5(2): 1, 2000.
Groundnut – Pearls on a String. 5(2): 1, 2000.
Adventures in West Virginia. 5(3): 4, 2000.
Juneberries, and Thimbleberries, and Huckleberries: Oh My! 5(3): 1, 2000.
Successful Approaches to Foraging. 5(3): 1, 2000.
Mining for Chanterelles. 5(4): 1, 2000.
Way Down Yonder in the Pawpaw Patch (Part 1). 5(4): 1, 2000.

Volume 6, 2001 (6.1 – 6.4)

Miners Lettuce. 6(1): 1, 2001.
Paw Paw Pudding & Custard. 6(1): 1, 2001.
Primitive Technology Rendezvous Teach Wild Foods. 6(1): 3, 2001.
Feasting My Way Through the 26th Ann. NC Wild Foods Weekend. 6(2): 1, 2001
Hairy Nightshade, Wild Spinach, & Green Amaranth. 6(2): 4, 2001.
Developing Wild Food Recipes. 6(3): 4, 2001.
Oxalates Schmokulates. 6(3): 1, 2001.
Sheep Sorrel – Finding the Good Stuff. 6(3): 1, 2001.
Processing and Using Sheep Sorrel. 6(4): 1, 2001.
Tapping Maple Trees. 6(4): 1, 2001.

Volume 7, 2002 (7.1 – 7.4)

Dandelion Bitterness – Differing Views (Part 1). 7(1): 4, 2002.
Forage for Florage and Foliage of Borage. 7(1): 1, 2002.
Over Tapping Maple Trees. 7(1): 11, 2002.
Common Mallows – Overlooked & Underutilized. 7(2): 1, 2002.
Original Marshmallow. 7(2): 1, 2002.
Western Blue Elderberries. 7(3): 1, 2002.
Mallow’s Mumbo Gumbo. 7(3): 1, 2002.
Horse Chestnuts and Buckeyes. 7(4): 1, 2002.
Report From The First Annual GingerRoot Rendezvous. 7(4): 4, 2002.
Sweet Chestnuts. 7(4): 1, 2002.

Volume 8, 2003 (8.1 – 8.3)

Cow Parsnips. 8(1): 1, 2003
Mayapple – A Lemon Banana Guava?. 8(1): 1, 2003
Photosensitizing Agents, Cephalalgia, & Looks Can Kill. 8(1): 4, 2003
Green Mallowmallow – Something Unconventional. 8(2): 1, 2003
Report From The First Annual Native Shores Rendezvous. 8(2): 1, 2003
2004 Wild Food Events. 8(2): 2, 2003
2004 Primitive Skills Events. 8(2): 3, 2003
A Wild Food Investigation: Cow Parsnips – A Substitute for Salt?. 8(2): 3, 2003
Red Sumacs – Gathering, Processing, & Storage Tips. 8(3): 1, 2003
Wild Thanksgiving Salad – A Christmas Story?. 8(3): 1, 2003
Wild Vegetarian Cookbook – A Book Review. 8(3): 6, 2003
Resources of The Southern Fields and Forests – A Book Review. 8(3): 10, 2003

Volume 9, 2004 (9.4)

Wild Sweet Pea – A Few of My Favorite Things. 9(4): 1, 2004
Lathyrism – What’s All the Fuss About. 9(4): 1, 2004
Diet & Health are Protective Against Lathyrism. 9(4): 14, 2004

Volume 10, 2005 (10.1 – 10.2)

Considerations on the Ideal Cattail Pollen Collector. 10(1): 1, 2005.
Sword Fern – An Abundant Edible? 10(1): 1, 2005.
Anti-Nutrients in Plants. 10(1): 3, 2005.
Sword Fern Molasses Cookies. 10(1): 4, 2005.
Mallow Whites, Egg Whites, and Mallow Meringue. 10(2): 1, 2005.
Mallowmallow Takes on the Marshmallow. 10(2): 1, 2005.
Writing from Experience vs Paraphrasing. 10(2): 3, 2005.
Wild Food Events in North America. 10(2): 3, 2005.
Wild Huckleberry Mallow Meringue Pie. 10(2): 7, 2005.

Volume 11, 2006 (11.1) – Last issue produced

Cattail – A Potential Goldmine. 11(1): 1, 2006
Living the Pre-History Native American Food gathering Life. 11(1): 1, 2006
Annual Wild Food Events Worth Attending in North America. 11(1): 3, 2006
Sword Fern – Edible or Not? 11(1): 4, 2006

Note: Issues 8.4 – 9.3 and 10.3 – 10.4 – DO NOT EXIST