Publications and Articles of John Kallas

Below is a list of books, magazine articles, newsletter articles and videos produced by John Kallas from 1983 to the present. Do a search for topics you are interested in or just read through the list. Follow links for some articles available at this web site.

Interpreting the numbers below — Most are formatted in this way: “4(3): 1, 1999” = “Volume 4 (# 3): Start Page, Year”.
The following are arranged by date starting with the most recent.

Wild Foods — Improving Dietary Health (50 minute Video). International Online Conference on Unconventional Food Plants. University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. October 17-21, 2016.

Beat the Bears to the Berries: Foraging for Wild Foods. Wilderness Medicine Magazine, April 4, 2014.

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate, Wild Food Adventure Series: Volume 1, June 2010, Publisher: Gibbs-Smith.

Edible Blue Camas: Staple Food of the West. Bulletin of Primitive Technology, Society of Primitive Technology, No. 28, Fall 2004, pp. 55-60.

Making Dandelions Palatable. Backwoods Home Magazine. No. 82, July / August 2003, pp. 8-12.

Gathering Fresh Asparagus, Broccoli, and Corn from Cattails. Bulletin of Primitive Technology, Society of Primitive Technology, No. 25, Spring 2003, pp. 51-54.

Modern Gathering Etiquette: Don’t Be a Wild Food Marauder. Bulletin of Primitive Technology, Society of Primitive Technology, No. 25, Spring 2003, p. 54.

Response to “Exploring the Horizons of Mycophagy”. Bulletin of Primitive Technology, Society of Primitive Technology, No. 25, Spring 2003, p. 67.

Wapato: Indian Potato. Wilderness Way Magazine. 9(1): 27-31, 2003.

Nettles: Naughty and Nice. Wild Foods Forum newsletter. 13(5):10, 2002.

Oxalates Schmokulates. The Forager newsletter. 2(2):22, 2002.

Acorns. Plants and Gardens News. The Newsletter of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 14(3):14, 1999.

Wild Food Primer. Wild Food Adventures, Portland, OR, April 28, 1999.

Cattails: Easy to Collect, Fun to Eat. Wilderness Way Magazine. 4(2): 8-13, 1998.

Edible Wild Plants: Catalyst and Content Area for Wilderness Education. 1997 Wilderness Education Association (WEA) 20th Annual Conference Proceedings, Gunnison, CO, March 6-8, 1997.

Edible Wild Plants from Neighborhood to Wilderness: A Catalyst for Experiential Education. 1996 Association for Experiential Education (AEE) 24th Annual International Conference Proceedings, Spokane, WA, September 26-29, 1996 pp. 140-144.

Oregon Grape – Not a True Grape. Wild Foods Forum newsletter. 7(5): 4, 1996.

Edible Wild Plants: Eating in Harmony with the Biosphere. EarthMatters, Newsletter of the Northwest Earth Institute, 921 SW Morrison St, Portland, Oregon 97205. (503) 227-2807. 3(1): 6, 1996, Spring Edition.

Volunteer Gourmet Garden Vegetables. Willamette Green Directory, Nov 95-Apr 96 Helios Environmental Resource Network, PO Box 12156, Eugene, OR 97440. (503) 302-1759, p 12, 1995.

Consumers’ Perceptions of Differences Between Three Pairs of Food Grouping Constructs. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan State University, 1987.

Food Choices For Variety: A Food Planner.”Eating Right is Basic 2″ Nutrition Education Curriculum, the EFNEP, MSU Cooperative Etension Service, East Lansing, MI, 1986.

Delighting in Wild Greens. Fine Cooking Magazine, April/May 1995, #8 pp 54-57.

Wild Marshmallows. Science Teacher Magazine, 51(5): 46-52, 1984, May Edition.

21 Common Poisonous Plants. Color Poster. Extension Bulletin E-1662, CES, Michigan State Univ, Lansing, MI. By Kathleen Kron, Photos by John Kallas, 1983.

 

Wild Food Adventurer Newsletter Articles
Wild Food Adventurer Newsletter Box Set

Wild Food Adventurer Newsletter Box Set. Out of print. In selected libraries across North America. Articles are here as links or may be available online in the future

The Wild Food Adventurer Newsletter, in Box Set form above, has a North American Wild Foods Focus. Some of the topics covered include gathering & preparation techniques, wild gourmet garden vegetables, food plants of Native Americans, feature articles on important wild foods, reviews of books & videos, edible plant identification, nutrition of wild foods, festival announcements, wilderness survival, sustainable living, sea shore edibles, poisonous plants, events calendars, book reviews, sea vegetables, and more.

The Wild Food Adventurer Newsletter spans 35 individual issues published over a 10 year period. The series began in 1996. The last issue was published in July of 2006 and is now out of print. It is mostly written by its editor and publisher, John Kallas, with occasional guest writers.

 

Feature articles published by John Kallas in the Wild Food Adventurer Newsletter. Arranged by title.

A Wild Food Investigation: Cow Parsnips – A Substitute for Salt?. 8(2): 3, 2003.

Acorn Processing: The Proof is in the Pudding. 4(3): 1, 1999.

Adventures in West Virginia. 5(3): 4, 2000.

Amaranth – Staple Food Source for Modern Foragers. 3(2): 1, 1998.

Anti-Nutrients in Plants. 10(1): 3, 2005.

Bull Thistle. 2(4): 1, 1997.

Cattails… Easy to Harvest, Fun to Eat. 1(1): 1, 1996.

Cattail Spikes: Pollen Means Protein. 1(2): 1, 1996.

Cattails Store Food For Winter. 1(3): 1, 1996.

Chickweed – It’s the Tops . 2(4): 1, 1997.

Clamming for Cockles. 3(3): 1, 1998.

Cockles in Captivity. 3(4): 1, 1998.

Common Mallows – Overlooked & Underutilized. 7(2): 1, 2002.

Considerations on the Ideal Cattail Pollen Collector. 10(1): 1, 2005.

Cow Parsnips. 8(1): 1, 2003.

Dandelions: The Good, The Bad, And the Ugly. 1(1): 1, 1996.

Dandelion Bitterness – Differing Views (Part 1). 7(1): 4, 2002.

Death Camas Toxicity. 3(2): 10, 1998.

Developing Wild Food Recipes. 6(3): 4, 2001.

Diet & Health are Protective Against Lathyrism. 9(4): 14, 2004.

Douglas Fir Chewing Gum: A Sappy Experience. 3(2): 11, 1998.

Edible Blue Camas: History and Identification. 3(1): 1, 1998.

Edible Blue Camas: Preparation Old and New. 3(2): 1, 1998.

Edible Wild Plants Defined… This May Save Your Life. 1(2): 3, 1996.

Euell Gibbons – The Father of Modern Wild Foods. 3(4): 1, 1998.

Feasting My Way Through the 26th Annual North Carolina Wild Foods Weekend. 6(2): 1, 2001.

Fiddleheads from Lady Fern. 2(1): 1, 1997.

Field Death Camas: History and Identification. 3(1): 1, 1998.

Forage for Florage and Foliage of Borage. 7(1): 1, 2002.

Green Mallowmallow – Something Unconventional. 8(2): 1, 2003.

Groundnut – Pearls on a String. 5(2): 1, 2000.

Hairy Nightshade, Wild Spinach, & Green Amaranth. 6(2): 4, 2001.

Horse Chestnuts and Buckeyes. 7(4): 1, 2002.

Itch Relief from Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac. 4(3): 10, 1999.

Juneberries, and Thimbleberries, and Huckleberries: Oh My! 5(3): 1, 2000.

Lathyrism – What’s All the Fuss About? 9(4): 1, 2004.

Making Flour from Cattail’s Starch Filled Rhizomes. 4(1): 1, 1999.

Mallow’s Mumbo Gumbo. 7(3): 1, 2002.

Mallow Whites, Egg Whites and Mallow Meringue. 10(2): 1, 2005.

Mallowmallow Takes on Marshmallow. 10(2): 1, 2005.

Mayapple – A Lemon Banana Guava?. 8(1): 1, 2003.

Miners Lettuce. 6(1): 1, 2001.

Mining for Chanterelles. 5(4): 1, 2000.

Mistaking Poison Hemlock for Wild Carrot. 4(4): 1, 1999.

Modern Gathering Etiquette: Don’t be a Wild Food Marauder. 1(2): 3, 1996.

Nettles: Naughty & Nice. 4(2): 1, 1999.

Oregon Grape: Not for the Faint of Taste. 2(2): 1, 1997.

Original Marshmallow. 7(2): 1, 2002.

Over Tapping Maple Trees. 7(1): 11, 2002.

Oxalates Schmokulates. 6(3): 1, 2001.

Paw Paw Pudding & Custard. 6(1): 1, 2001.

Personal Risk & Enlightenment . 2(4): 5, 1997.

Photosensitizing Agents, Cephalalgia, & Looks Can Kill. 8(1): 4, 2003.

Poison Hemlock’s Deadly Flavor. 4(4): 8, 1999.

Poison Ivy, Poison Oak. 4(2): 1, 1999.

Poison Sumac. 4(3): 10, 1999.

Primitive Technology Rendezvous Teach Wild Foods. 6(1): 3, 2001.

Processing and Using Sheep Sorrel. 6(4): 1, 2001.

Report From The First Annual GingerRoot Rendezvous. 7(4): 4, 2002.

Report From The First Annual Native Shores Rendezvous. 8(2): 1, 2003.

Sassafras – Extraordinarily Flavorful Carcinogen. 3(3): 1, 1998.

Sheep Sorrel – Finding the Good Stuff. 6(3): 1, 2001.

Skunk Cabbage… Lives Up to Its Name. 2(1): 1, 1997.

Successful Approaches to Foraging. 5(3): 1, 2000.

Sweet Chestnuts. 7(4): 1, 2002.

Sword Fern – An Abundant Edible? 10(1): 1, 2005.

Sword Fern Molasses Cookies. 10(1): 4, 2005.

Tapping Maple Trees. 6(4): 1, 2001.

Tawny Day Lily – Unpredictably Tainted Fare. 5(2): 1, 2000.

Rose Hips and Vitamin C. 1(3): 1, 1996.

Wapato, Indian Potato. 1(4): 1, 1996.

Way Down Yonder in the Pawpaw Patch (Part 1). 5(4): 1, 2000.

Western Blue Elderberries. 7(3): 1, 2002.

Wild Carrot and Poison Hemlock in Flower. 5(1): 1, 2000.

Wild Carrot Flavor & Texture. 4(4): 1, 1999.

Wild Edibles Abound at U-Pick Farms. 2(2): 1, 1997.

Wild Food Roundtable. 4(1): 1, 1999.

Wild Foods – Does Anybody Sell This Stuff??!. 5(2): 10, 2000.

Wild Gourmet Garden Vegetables. 1(4): 1, 1996.

Wild Huckleberry Mallow Meringue Pie. 10(2): 7, 2005.

Wild Lettuce, a Prickly Sight. 2(3): 1, 1997.

Wild Mustard – Fine Greens Almost All Year Long. 5(1): 1, 2000.

Wild Spinach: Delicious, Nutritious, and Abundant. 1(2): 1, 1996.

Wild Sweet Pea – A Few of My Favorite Things. 9(4): 1, 2004.

Wild Thanksgiving Salad – A Christmas Story?. 8(3): 1, 2003.

Wild Vegetarian Cookbook – A Book Review. 8(3): 6, 2003.

Wakas, Indian Popcorn. 2(3): 1, 1997.

Writing From Experience vs Paraphrasing. 10(2): 3, 2005.

Y2K Gone, Wild Foods Persist. 5(1): 2, 2000.

Volume 1, 1996 (1.1 – 1.4)

Cattails… Easy to Harvest, Fun to Eat. 1(1): 1, 1996.
Dandelions: The Good, The Bad, And the Ugly. 1(1): 1, 1996.
Wild Spinach: Delicious, Nutritious, and Abundant. 1(2): 1, 1996.
Edible Wild Plants Defined… This May Save Your Life. 1(2): 3, 1996.
Modern Gathering Etiquette: Don’t be a Wild Food Marauder. 1(2): 3, 1996.
Cattail Spikes: Pollen Means Protein. 1(2): 1, 1996.
Cattails Store Food For Winter. 1(3): 1, 1996.
Rose Hips and Vitamin C. 1(3): 1, 1996.
Wapato, Indian Potato. 1(4): 1, 1996..
Wild Gourmet Garden Vegetables. 1(4): 1, 1996.

Volume 2, 1997 (2.1 – 2.4)

Fiddleheads from Lady Fern. 2(1): 1, 1997
Skunk Cabbage… Lives Up to Its Name. 2(1): 1, 1997.
Wild Edibles Abound at U-Pick Farms. 2(2): 1, 1997.
Oregon Grape: Not for the Faint of Taste. 2(2): 1, 1997.
Wakas, Indian Popcorn. 2(3): 1, 1997.
Wild Lettuce, a Prickly Sight. 2(3): 1, 1997.
Bull Thistle. 2(4): 1, 1997.
Chickweed – It’s the Tops . 2(4): 1, 1997.
Personal Risk and Enlightenment . 2(4): 5, 1997.

Volume 3, 1998 (3.1 – 3.4)

Field Death Camas: History and Identification. 3(1): 1, 1998.
Edible Blue Camas: History and Identification. 3(1): 1, 1998.
Edible Blue Camas: Preparation Old and New. 3(2): 1, 1998.
Douglas Fir Chewing Gum: A Sappy Experience. 3(2): 11, 1998.
Amaranth – Staple Food Source for Modern Foragers. 3(2): 1, 1998.
Death Camas Toxicity. 3(2): 10, 1998.
Sassafras – Extraordinarily Flavorful Carcinogen. 3(3): 1, 1998.
Clamming for Cockles. 3(3): 1, 1998.
Cockles in Captivity. 3(4): 1, 1998.
Euell Gibbons – The Father of Modern Wild Foods. 3(4): 1, 1998.

Volume 4, 1999 (4.1 – 4.4)

Wild Food Roundtable. 4(1): 1, 1999.
Making Flour from Cattail’s Starch Filled Rhizomes. 4(1): 1, 1999.
Nettles: Naughty & Nice. 4(2): 1, 1999.
Poison Ivy, Poison Oak. 4(2): 1, 1999.
Poison Sumac. 4(3): 10, 1999.
Acorn Processing: The Proof is in the Pudding. 4(3): 1, 1999.
Itch Relief from Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac. 4(3): 10, 1999.
Mistaking Poison Hemlock for Wild Carrot. 4(4): 1, 1999.
Poison Hemlock’s Deadly Flavor. 4(4): 8, 1999.
Wild Carrot Flavor & Texture. 4(4): 1, 1999.

Volume 5, 2000 (5.1 – 5.4)

Wild Carrot and Poison Hemlock in Flower. 5(1): 1, 2000.
Wild Mustard – Fine Greens Almost All Year Long. 5(1): 1, 2000.
Y2K Gone, Wild Foods Persist. 5(1): 2, 2000.
Wild Foods – Does Anybody Sell This Stuff??!. 5(2): 10, 2000.
Tawny Day Lily – Unpredictably Tainted Fare. 5(2): 1, 2000.
Groundnut – Pearls on a String. 5(2): 1, 2000.
Adventures in West Virginia. 5(3): 4, 2000.
Juneberries, and Thimbleberries, and Huckleberries: Oh My! 5(3): 1, 2000.
Successful Approaches to Foraging. 5(3): 1, 2000.
Mining for Chanterelles. 5(4): 1, 2000.
Way Down Yonder in the Pawpaw Patch (Part 1). 5(4): 1, 2000.

Volume 6, 2001 (6.1 – 6.4)

Miners Lettuce. 6(1): 1, 2001.
Paw Paw Pudding & Custard. 6(1): 1, 2001.
Primitive Technology Rendezvous Teach Wild Foods. 6(1): 3, 2001.
Feasting My Way Through the 26th Ann. NC Wild Foods Weekend. 6(2): 1, 2001
Hairy Nightshade, Wild Spinach, & Green Amaranth. 6(2): 4, 2001.
Developing Wild Food Recipes. 6(3): 4, 2001.
Oxalates Schmokulates. 6(3): 1, 2001.
Sheep Sorrel – Finding the Good Stuff. 6(3): 1, 2001.
Processing and Using Sheep Sorrel. 6(4): 1, 2001.
Tapping Maple Trees. 6(4): 1, 2001.

Volume 7, 2002 (7.1 – 7.4)

Dandelion Bitterness – Differing Views (Part 1). 7(1): 4, 2002.
Forage for Florage and Foliage of Borage. 7(1): 1, 2002.
Over Tapping Maple Trees. 7(1): 11, 2002.
Common Mallows – Overlooked & Underutilized. 7(2): 1, 2002.
Original Marshmallow. 7(2): 1, 2002.
Western Blue Elderberries. 7(3): 1, 2002.
Mallow’s Mumbo Gumbo. 7(3): 1, 2002.
Horse Chestnuts and Buckeyes. 7(4): 1, 2002.
Report From The First Annual GingerRoot Rendezvous. 7(4): 4, 2002.
Sweet Chestnuts. 7(4): 1, 2002.

Volume 8, 2003 (8.1 – 8.3)

Cow Parsnips. 8(1): 1, 2003
Mayapple – A Lemon Banana Guava?. 8(1): 1, 2003
Photosensitizing Agents, Cephalalgia, & Looks Can Kill. 8(1): 4, 2003
Green Mallowmallow – Something Unconventional. 8(2): 1, 2003
Report From The First Annual Native Shores Rendezvous. 8(2): 1, 2003
2004 Wild Food Events. 8(2): 2, 2003
2004 Primitive Skills Events. 8(2): 3, 2003
A Wild Food Investigation: Cow Parsnips – A Substitute for Salt?. 8(2): 3, 2003
Red Sumacs – Gathering, Processing, & Storage Tips. 8(3): 1, 2003
Wild Thanksgiving Salad – A Christmas Story?. 8(3): 1, 2003
Wild Vegetarian Cookbook – A Book Review. 8(3): 6, 2003
Resources of The Southern Fields and Forests – A Book Review. 8(3): 10, 2003

Volume 9, 2004 (9.4)

Wild Sweet Pea – A Few of My Favorite Things. 9(4): 1, 2004
Lathyrism – What’s All the Fuss About. 9(4): 1, 2004
Diet & Health are Protective Against Lathyrism. 9(4): 14, 2004

Volume 10, 2005 (10.1 – 10.2)

Considerations on the Ideal Cattail Pollen Collector. 10(1): 1, 2005.
Sword Fern – An Abundant Edible? 10(1): 1, 2005.
Anti-Nutrients in Plants. 10(1): 3, 2005.
Sword Fern Molasses Cookies. 10(1): 4, 2005.
Mallow Whites, Egg Whites, and Mallow Meringue. 10(2): 1, 2005.
Mallowmallow Takes on the Marshmallow. 10(2): 1, 2005.
Writing from Experience vs Paraphrasing. 10(2): 3, 2005.
Wild Food Events in North America. 10(2): 3, 2005.
Wild Huckleberry Mallow Meringue Pie. 10(2): 7, 2005.

Volume 11, 2006 (11.1) – Last issue produced

Cattail – A Potential Goldmine. 11(1): 1, 2006
Living the Pre-History Native American Food gathering Life. 11(1): 1, 2006
Annual Wild Food Events Worth Attending in North America. 11(1): 3, 2006
Sword Fern – Edible or Not? 11(1): 4, 2006

Note: Issues 8.4 – 9.3 and 10.3 – 10.4 – DO NOT EXIST